‘His published writings show an elegantly articulate musical discrimination.’ Christopher Hogwood’s entry in the 1980 New Grove Dictionary was fulsome—and accurate. Still in his 30s, Chris had already authored two major books—and an avalanche of published writings was to follow, for various dictionaries and journals, notably the proceedings of biennial conferences at The International Centre for Clavichord Studies, of which Chris was co-director. As one obituary put it, essays flew off his desk—on Dowland, Handel, Haydn, Mendelssohn, Mozart, Purcell and many others.

Chris’s classic book on Handel from 1984 was translated into Czech, German, Italian, Japanese, Polish and Spanish. It is a fine illustration of elegant, articulate and discriminating prose, and above all commands a cultural agenda way beyond music. Chris had a wide-ranging perspective on the past and his active, intelligent mind was always connecting disparate subjects,...

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