Music regulators in two string quartets: a comparison of communicative behaviors between low- and high-stress performance conditions

Biasutti, M. and Concina, E. and Wasley, D. and Williamon, A. (2016) Music regulators in two string quartets: a comparison of communicative behaviors between low- and high-stress performance conditions. Frontiers in Psychology, 7 (1229). pp. 1-10. ISSN 1664-1078

This is the latest version of this item.

Abstract

In ensemble performances, group members use particular bodily behaviors as a sort of “language” to supplement the lack of verbal communication. This article focuses on music regulators, which are defined as signs to other group members for coordinating performance. The following two music regulators are considered: body gestures for articulating attacks (a set of movements externally directed that are used to signal entrances in performance) and eye contact. These regulators are recurring observable behaviors that play an important role in non-verbal communication among ensemble members. To understand how they are used by chamber musicians, video recordings of two string quartet performances (Quartet A performing Bartók and Quartet B performing Haydn) were analyzed under two conditions: a low stress performance (LSP), undertaken in a rehearsal setting, and a high stress performance (HSP) during a public recital. The results provide evidence for more emphasis in gestures for articulating attacks (i.e., the perceived strength of a performed attack-type body gesture) during HSP than LSP. Conversely, no significant differences were found for the frequency of eye contact between HSP and LSP. Moreover, there was variability in eye contact during HSP and LSP, showing that these behaviors are less standardized and may change according to idiosyncratic performance conditions. Educational implications are discussed for improving interpersonal communication skills during ensemble performance.

Available Versions of this Item

  • Music regulators in two string quartets: a comparison of communicative behaviors between low- and high-stress performance conditions. (deposited 26 Sep 2016 16:34) [Currently Displayed]

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item